The NHTSA is probing Google-supported Waymo regarding crashes caused by its driverless taxi program and underperforming self-driving tech.

  • deegeese@sopuli.xyz
    link
    fedilink
    English
    arrow-up
    45
    ·
    13 days ago

    As expected, Waymo deflects responsibility for the crash, as if no human driver has ever encountered a car being towed.

    The company says one of its vehicles encountered a tow truck improperly pulling a pickup, which was facing rearward and askew across a center turn lane and regular traffic lane.

    • RubberDuck@lemmy.world
      link
      fedilink
      English
      arrow-up
      44
      arrow-down
      1
      ·
      13 days ago

      A situation a human would have easily navigated.

      This whole alpha testing driverless vehicles on the public road is bullshit.

      • TopRamenBinLaden@sh.itjust.works
        link
        fedilink
        English
        arrow-up
        8
        arrow-down
        1
        ·
        12 days ago

        I mean, Waymo should definitely be held accountable and take responsibility for this accident, as it is something most human drivers would easily drive around. Them trying to blame it on other things is bullshit.

        That being said, Waymos’ driverless cars are already much safer than the average human driver.

        The alpha testing on public roads is a bit iffy, but idk how well they would be able to really QA test in a closed environment. Personally, I’m more concerned with sharing the road with many terrible human drivers that we already are forced to do. The faster we can get the driverless thing going, the better off we will be.

        • RubberDuck@lemmy.world
          link
          fedilink
          English
          arrow-up
          6
          ·
          12 days ago

          If there are tests on public roads, there should be independent government oversight financed by a fee on the company testing. Not to mention there should be special insurance by the company.

          The government should mandate telemetry, reporting and safety precaution standards that have to be followed. This will allow the government to also learn as these systems become more commonplace.

          But that is my opinion.

          • AlotOfReading@lemmy.world
            link
            fedilink
            English
            arrow-up
            5
            arrow-down
            1
            ·
            12 days ago

            There is independent government oversight. That’s NHTSA, the agency doing these investigations. The companies operating these vehicles also have insurance as a requirement of public operating permits (managed by the states). NHTSA also requires mandatory reporting of accidents involving these vehicles and has safety standards.

            The only thing missing is the fee, and I’m not sure what purpose that’s supposed to serve. Regulators shouldn’t be directly paid by the organizations they’re regulating.

            • RubberDuck@lemmy.world
              link
              fedilink
              English
              arrow-up
              1
              ·
              12 days ago

              Nah, these organizations have been gutted over the years in the name of small government. To the point that they do not have the Manpower to actually properly regulate or oversee.

              I’m talking about a dedicated team of specialists that oversee these kind of processes. These specialists don’t come cheap.

              The fee is paid to the federal government and should be sufficient for the government to finance the oversight of innovation like this.